Does intelligence have as much value in society as we like to think?

Does intelligence have as much value in society as we like to think?

The minor amount of people with STEM degrees who can even get a job in the field (let alone a decent job to begin) is making me doubt that, and with various other "prestigious" degrees. And that's not to mention how a lot rich, successful people tend to be such by either chance, being born into it, knowing the right people, or just being in the right place at the right time. And those who do manage to make it big through intellect alone, though often the most influential, tend to be few and far between.

What people and society actually considers valuable never makes any logical sense when looked at. Ex.: in the United States, scientific research that doesn't yield a foreseeable profit, or fits a certain party's agenda, almost never get funded.

Attached: not-okay.png (591x716, 322K)

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scientificamerican.com/article/does-the-us-produce-too-m/

Socially if youre confident you will have an upper hand. Intelligent people gravitate towards likeminded individuals.

What the fuck are you on? STEM people are very employable. You obviously are not intelligent enough to get a STEM degree.

Here's something i wish i learnt when i'm younger.
But it's impossible to learn until i had experiences in actual society.

Social skills are way more important than actual skills.
I can land a job much easier when i'm recommended by someone.
I can basically slack off most of the time and nobody will say anything because i maintained good relationship with them, also that i did my job as requested, only never volunteer to do more.
I wish i'm better in social skills, so i can get promoted and shits.
But i also know that such skills are learnt through time, and it can't be forced.

second, having a positive attitude and clear goal will helps you as well.
People around you are more keen to help you if you yourself wanted to succeed.
Because they wanted to see you succeed.

So, about the topic.
Intelligence have huge impact and value when you're on the top.
But being above average are not really as important.

>Does intelligence have as much value in society as we like to think?
Depends on who you ask, obviously.
If you ask some lead technician who actually does work at openAI or Cern or Tesla or something they'll probably say yes.
If you ask the owner of a supermarket chain if he needs his stackers to be educated he'll probably laugh his ass of and select by height/face/frame.

To add; the first reply is a good rule of thumb i'd assume. Sounds reasonable

If there's 2 things life has taught me so far, it's that in life to be successful it doesn't matter what you know, it's who you know. And secondly, to get rich you need assets, which then build and make more assets and more money. You can either start with something small and grow it if you play it right, or if you're lucky and are handed a big pile to start with you can make it bigger quite easily with almost no actual work.

Your knowledge and the sweat on your brow is worthless in the grand scheme of things, the rich ones are getting richer all the time and the poor ones are getting poorer. If you've got money you can make more money. If you don't have it, you ain't got shit.

But then, how do you measure wealth and value? Is it a dollar figure? or is it your happiness?

Quite honestly I think I would be happier and therefore wealthier with a house that I built, isolated from people, with a large workable land and a group of people/neighbors I would actually enjoy having round for dinner every so often.

>STEM people are very employable.
Most of them aren't; especially here in the US. We don't invest very much into STEM jobs.

- scientificamerican.com/article/does-the-us-produce-too-m/

>STEM people are very employable.
/sci/ here, AHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!!!!

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stem isn't for smart people
it's for dumb and average people to feel smart
real smart people make it no matter what they choose to study
there's so many morons majoring in stem at top universities

>Quite honestly I think I would be happier and therefore wealthier with a house that I built, isolated from people, with a large workable land and a group of people/neighbors I would actually enjoy having round for dinner every so often.
Sounds good, doesn't it?
Only thing is that when you get to where you want to be, where will you go next?

The most important thing in life I learned myself is that stagnation is death.
Setbacks can help move you forward and success is obviously preferable but standing still is the worst thing a human can do to themselves.
I've made it my lifes mission to see how far out of the hole I was born in I can crawl, and so far so good.
I don't care for how people preceive my progress or how they think i should calm down or i'm doing great already and should get some rest.
I don't care for the haters and fake friends making me mad motivation.
They'll never have power over me or my goal, noone ever will.
This is what gives my life meaning, and in the meanwhile I hope I can cut some other people's strings.

Raw intelligence is overrated. Social skills and work ethic will get you further in society. Moreover, in life generally, intelligence doesn't necessarily come with wisdom, savvy etc. I'm on a physics degree and there're a lot of people who won't be very employable because they can barely talk to people.

>stem isn't for smart people
Not to be an IQ loser but this just isn't true. The rest of your post I agree with though.

>Not to be an IQ loser but this just isn't true. The rest of your post I agree with though.
It is though.
You don't have to be intelligent to do stem at all.
Standardized rules, formulas and principles and only a few in depth highly abstract subjects which can be learned by 'average intelligence' provided they have a good instructor.
Sorry, stem isn't hard.

A lot of STEM people work outside their field. You make the mistake of thinking this means they are unemployed or working at Walmart. The fact is that STEM people are very employable but like your article says there are not so many positions in academic research. Most work in industry, engineering, IT, business, finance, and so on. Understand now why you were wrong?
Found the bitter liberal arts major.

You don't have a fucking clue. Stem is not about memorizing unlike medical.

Did you read my post, or just nitpick?
>You don't have a fucking clue
Completed STEM in the Netherlands and work in maintaining the largest windmills on the planet, so nice try but I do have a clue.
Stem isn't hard.

I guess we'll gave to agree to disagree. There is probably a not-insignificant variance of difficulty between STEM courses, but they're hard, and being intelligent is the easiest way to complete them, closely followed by work ethic.
Seems more likely to me that you have incredibly high standards for what you consider intelligent. I've looked at the past papers for my quantum module and anybody who passes this year is clever in my book.

This guy is right

You didn't read ^^^'s post

>completed STEM
>it wasn't hard

oooh so this is about your ego, where's the tripcode though?

btw I'm
and
seeing as we're all about our identities right now ;)

meant not GOSH this is confusing, lucky you work on windmills and will be able to decipher

It's not about my ego, but you're saying I don't have a clue while I arguable do since I've worked in different high-end industries and so far I've not seen exceptional intelligence in the so-called 'intelligent stem engineers' that supposedly are building everything.

Whatever man, the truth is I enjoy my work immensely and never thought I would be able to do all this stuff.
But to say college/uni courses in stem are hard or you need above average intelligence is retarded.

Have you ever seen a dumb person with a PhD in theoretical physics?

If you’re intelligent enough to see the rules of the game but not enough to break through and don’t have money, then it will just give you depression

If your class in uni isn’t hard, you’re wasting your money
You’ve obviously never taken a rigorous technical class

>If your class in uni isn’t hard, you’re wasting your money
>You’ve obviously never taken a rigorous technical class
You didn't read my posts at all, did you?
You must be a STEM student.

Guess you got me there friend.
Good luck.

Quoted wrong person you k ow what I mean though

I guess this user's opinion is superior to mine.

Graduate, the uni I went to had very “silo”d departments so I had experience with different degrees of difficulty and perception of difficulty.

A full 90% of STEM students cannot write a simple mathematical proof

>Graduate, the uni I went to had very “silo”d departments so I had experience with different degrees of difficulty and perception of difficulty.
>A full 90% of STEM students cannot write a simple mathematical proof
I wasn't arguing you on these points at all though.
This is me

You guys are fucking losers. Look at yourselves.

It's the most important factor for determining income, so yes.
The reason so many smart people have to work nonacademic jobs is because other people are still important. Complexity is not a merit in its own right. You have to give people a reason to pay for the complex things you are capable of.