Hello which programming language should i learn first?

Alexander Peterson
Alexander Peterson

hello which programming language should i learn first?
you should learn Python
NO! Python will teach you bad habits, you need something more rigorous like c
NO! you should learn something more modern like Rust
NO! Rust is a meme you better go with c++
NO!...

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youtube.com/watch?v=Nl680alGY2A
cprogramming.com/tutorial/c-tutorial.html
learn-c.org/
learncpp.com/
cplusplus.com/doc/tutorial/
cprogramming.com/tutorial/c -tutorial.html
en.cppreference.com/
isocpp.org/faq
learnpython.org/
codecademy.com/en/tracks/python
wiki.installgentoo.com/index.php/Programming_resources
tiobe.com/tiobe-index/
papl.cs.brown.edu/2018/index.html
brown.hosted.panopto.com/Panopto/Pages/Sessions/List.aspx#folderID="2559ad35-3fff-4ef1-a2ac-a951011eb91e"&maxResults=50
cs.brown.edu/courses/csci0190/2018/assignments.html
github.com/functionalCS/190labs
code.pyret.org/
janestreet.com/tech-talks/curriculumn-design/
youtu.be/SmiuqIcvfj0
youtu.be/vRpeVcjMvNo
youtu.be/cu8e3nikyQk
kotlinlang.org/docs/tutorials/kotlin-for-py/introduction.html

Christian Watson
Christian Watson

obviously python retard

Ethan Wilson
Ethan Wilson

What do you want to do? How smart are you?

Liam Baker
Liam Baker

any monkey can pick up a new language in 2 weeks.
you have to learn CS or software engineering if you want to so something useful.

Ethan Harris
Ethan Harris

Don't learn programming, learn something else that requires programming, and pick the language best suited for that task.

Brody Collins
Brody Collins

Just pic related, user.

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Jacob Ortiz
Jacob Ortiz

doesn't matter, you'll end up learning multiple anyway. stick with a relatively easy one for beginners and just get fucking learning

Jeremiah Perez
Jeremiah Perez

Anything with a somewhat modern type system will do (C++, Java, Rust). You need generics and instances to be more efficient with data structures. You need RAII for decent memory management. You need either exceptions or a good error type with all the syntactical tools that go with it (Rust's Error, ? and ok_or) for error management. Python is OO but retarded on every level ("""generics""" are just loose typing, __main__, indenting having semantics, no distinction between instance and reference). FP is academia meme. C has no modern feature whatsoever and is a memory hell. You won't use formal methods before at least 5 years of experience.

Dylan Smith
Dylan Smith

I started by learning VB.NET

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Dylan Lopez
Dylan Lopez

Good choice, if strict, strong and infer was enabled the whole time.

Isaac Martin
Isaac Martin

If you want a genuine recommendation from Jow Forums you'd better post your gender and IQ first

Isaac King
Isaac King

This. Just learn a bunch of languages. They are all the same basically.

Thomas Carter
Thomas Carter

t. Poo

Brody Hill
Brody Hill

Sometimes you have to make your own decisions

Dylan Reed
Dylan Reed

C#

Henry Rivera
Henry Rivera

This is what happens when you overthink stuff.
Plenty of programmers have started with C, C++, Python, Java, Scheme, Pascal, shell scripting. It doesn't matter what you start with, if you start with Python eventually you'll want to learn C too, and vice-versa.
FWIW, I think starting with Python is good because the syntax is simple and you can build very useful programs using the excellent libraries from the Python ecosystem. But, literally, start with whatever the fuck you want.

Daniel Stewart
Daniel Stewart

Just use python you retard. Literally python or javascript. Both will expose you to the main important things about programming and you can learn the not easy problems of programming later with languages like c++ or rust

Mason Garcia
Mason Garcia

Learn D you retard.

Jeremiah Bailey
Jeremiah Bailey

Haskell
Just throwing it out there

Jayden Jones
Jayden Jones

Fundamentals of Computer Programming with C# by Svetlin Nakov

Dylan Smith
Dylan Smith

NOOOOO WHY ARE YOU NOT LEARNING PYTHON?!!

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Jeremiah Perry
Jeremiah Perry

C
C++
Java/C#
Scheme/Common Lisp/Clojure
JavaScript
Haskell

ther you go, that's your list

Xavier Taylor
Xavier Taylor

This. And to do that you need to learn C. So just learn C

Nolan James
Nolan James

No one uses C besides $9 poojins and chinks

Charles Moore
Charles Moore

It's not about use, it's about education. Learning C will teach you some fundamental CS concepts

Michael Howard
Michael Howard

Like what?

Colton Powell
Colton Powell

I started with ActionScript

Jaxon Adams
Jaxon Adams

It really doesnt matter what language you're using if you know how to program. Just pick something that seems interesting to you and go for it. Python is a good choice. This is probably bait though :(

Christopher Fisher
Christopher Fisher

stop being poor and pay people to program for you

Tyler Bell
Tyler Bell

C is a good choice because it's lower level than other languages and doesn't 'hide' your hardware from you as much. If you use it to learn, you'll also understand a few things about how a computer works. It's good for a beginner because it simultaneously teaches you how things work while also being a simple language at its core, so by learning C you will learn the basics which then apply to a whole lot of other languages. If you start with a much higher level language you risk learning not how things work in general, but how they work in that particular language's particular abstractions. You may find it more difficult to switch to another language when you find that said other language does not have the features you have learned to rely upon. C is at the foundation and as such it is a good place to start, because it will be very easy for you to build upon the knowledge you have from C and understand higher level, more abstracted languages.

Adrian Reed
Adrian Reed

Based. C is perfect for doing trivial things, and when you're a beginner, (first year or three) EVERYTHING you do should be trivial. If you try to be clever, you'll hate yourself later. If you try to use a fancy language feature, you'll hate yourself later.

3 things are literally all you need to know:
Types (int, char, char*, array, void, etc)
Iterators (for/while and goto (yes, goto!)
Conditionals (if/else and fall-through)

Make pure functions, keep everything on the stack so you don't have to worry about who's job it is to free memory, and don't pass around pointers.

Syntax takes getting used to, but It'll make you able to read 90% of the languages out there.

Makefiles are useful for cutting compile times from 0.5 seconds to 0.2 seconds, and will save you keystrokes when you compile, which should be 2-3 times a minute (every time you change something)

You'll want to write tests. So use assert. It's dead-simple: assert(true) doesn't crash your program. assert(false) does.

Eventually you'll want to group code into separate objects. So use header files. Simple.

One day you'll do something non-trivial like parsing a QUERY_STRING from your website's forms into a sanitized map that you can apply to your database. Then you can try C++.

Jose Barnes
Jose Barnes

Doesn't matter what language you learn first, but you should learn many languages to really understand what language is the best for a certain task.
The order that worked for me was:
Pascal > C++ > Java > C# > F# > Python > Javascript > Ruby

Jace Turner
Jace Turner

Java.

Logan Gomez
Logan Gomez

Learn Javascript unironically. Node is nice as fuck for backend and NPM has the largest library of prebuilt shit, you can learn Mongo to do your databases and API's with JSON, you can replace cookies with LocalStorage which is just like JSON and there's tons of shit like passport.js to make logins easy as fuck, you can do frontend web development too, plus there's massive support of frameworks and libraries. You can do pretty much everything web related front and back with just one language.

Adrian Anderson
Adrian Anderson

Unironically learn JavaScript and the basics of full-stack development. You will learn so much extra stuff along the way like server management and databases

Tyler Bailey
Tyler Bailey

youtube.com/watch?v=Nl680alGY2A

Charles Long
Charles Long

Baste unironic javascripters.

Chase Ortiz
Chase Ortiz

What the fuck I should read the whole thread first next time before making posts like these

Sebastian Harris
Sebastian Harris

If you want to be a knowledgeable and efficent programmer, start with ASM or C.
both force you to learn how to manage the stack, how programs work, and how most abstraction for other languages comes.
If you want to be a lazy programmer, start with java or python.

Evan Lee
Evan Lee

It's fine. Hivemind posts re-enforces in the head of other's the point being made. If two people come to the same conclusion in a row other's see the point as more valid.

Hunter Lee
Hunter Lee

It doesn’t fucking matter. Once I picked up C. It took a week to be /comfy/ in Python

Nicholas White
Nicholas White

Honesty I went for full-stack because of all the random shit I learned which allowed me to put a bunch of random stuff on my resume. Seemed to work pretty well since I haven't had any problems finding a job

Charles Carter
Charles Carter

Full stack is nice. I'm real into the MEAN stack. I've got e-friends who only know Mongo or only know the basics of Node who were able to get decent jobs. Meanwhile I'm in Georgia working in a factory doing this shit for fun because I don't wanna leave my small town just to get a real job.

Oliver Ward
Oliver Ward

learn anything useful to start. python/ruby would probably be easiest. write a few programs and read through some code.
use your newfound knowledge of programming logic and then pick up something more rigorous. most people are just being fags if they start acting like an elitist about a particular language. c/c++/java would be good for this.

if you really hate yourself start with asm or brainfuck.

Ethan Gonzalez
Ethan Gonzalez

like "WHY THE FUCK CANT I HAVE GENERICS" so you can appreciate generics later

Joshua Ross
Joshua Ross

Is ruby still a thing even? It was the biggest meme in like 2012 but now no one uses it.

Hunter Long
Hunter Long

honestly, no clue. jekyll is written in ruby, but that's not saying much. i just know it's easy to learn and start scripting with. should be good for a beginner.
python is probably a better bet all things considered.

Easton Hill
Easton Hill

there are enough sites in rails, that will remain in rails, for it to be a profitable niche for a long time. I think a lot of ruby devs have also been migrating to elixir for new projects.

John Clark
John Clark

A friend got me a "learn python" book in response to me bitching about my job, will learning python/HTML/CSS/JavaScript actually let me work anywhere? Or is it more of a "now you can freelance" sort of thing?

Josiah Cox
Josiah Cox

work anywhere? probably not.
automate your work? probably. i remember reading some nerd talk about how he automated something like 80-90% of his job and got a raise and promotion when he was previously a desk jockey. worth picking up either way.

Michael Jackson
Michael Jackson

Learn data types and structures, iterators and conditionals. Different languages have different ways to implement these three basic things, that will teach you more about how your computer works. After that, do whatever you like but don't skip algorithms, big O notation and OOP.

The most popular languages are the big four: Java, C, C++ and Python.These four languages are multipurpose, so you can do most tasks with them. In the case of Python, never forget is glue, depends of other languages, like C, to be actually good.
Other nice options are javascript, SQL, C#, Swift, R and Matlab, but some of them are for somewhat niche applications.

Finally, books and documentation are always the best choice to learn new stuff but sometimes, you will want to watch videos, that's also a nice option but pick actually good ones, the SICP MIT series is a good start. Avoid everything with a pajeet talking.

Samuel Scott
Samuel Scott

college sounds perfect for you, since you like being told what to do and not make choices for yourself

Charles Mitchell
Charles Mitchell

So you want to learn programming?

Pick a starting language. For beginners, there are generally two recommended "programming families" that you can choose to start learning:
-Dynamically typed/interpreted programming languages, such as: Python, Perl, Ruby
-Statically typed/compiled programming languages, such as: C, C++, C#

These are amongst the most popular languages in use worldwide, including 4 from the top 5. Both approaches are perfectly fine, and well-documented.
-Dynamically typed programming may be a bit more flexible, convenient, and forgiving. It is more popular in academia.
-Statically typed programming is a bit more suited for making general applications. It is more popular in industries.

Cannot decide? Flip a coin.

If you choose statically typed/compiled programming, you may want to start with C, then pick up C++. C is very well documented, and teaches many universal programming concepts. C++ is based on C, and adds new concepts. Sources:
For C:
The C Programming Language (K&R)
C Primer Plus (Prata)
cprogramming.com/tutorial/c-tutorial.html
learn-c.org/

For C++:
learncpp.com/
cplusplus.com/doc/tutorial/
cprogramming.com/tutorial/c -tutorial.html
en.cppreference.com/
isocpp.org/faq

If you choose dynamically typed/interpreted programming, you may want to start with Python. It is very easy to pick up. Here are some good sources:
learnpython.org/
codecademy.com/en/tracks/python

BUT I WANT MORE SOURCES!
Read: wiki.installgentoo.com/index.php/Programming_resources

BUT I WANNA START WITH [language x] INSTEAD!
Sure, if you like. But the languages above are considered good for beginners.

BUT I WANNA MAKE A COOL WEBSITE!
Learn HTML, CSS, and Javascript.

BUT I WANNA MAKE iPHONE GAMES!
Learn Objective C and/or Swift.

BUT I WANNA MAKE ANDROID GAMES!
Learn Java.

BUT I WANNA MAKE PC GAMES!
Learn patience.

Colton James
Colton James

the big four: Java, C, C++ and Python
You got meme'd by Jow Forums.

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Noah Bell
Noah Bell

tiobe.com/tiobe-index/
Whatever

Benjamin Cox
Benjamin Cox

Stackoverflow and shithub represents the most important languages
Not the most brainlet tier

Evan Sullivan
Evan Sullivan

Learn C first (dont skip pointers).
Then Java for OOP.
Now you should be able to learn almost everything easily and to decide which ones the best for you.

Isaiah Brooks
Isaiah Brooks

exceptions are trash, and raii is too by extension

Parker Taylor
Parker Taylor

You want to learn to program in <current year>
First, the book: papl.cs.brown.edu/2018/index.html
Second, the lectures: brown.hosted.panopto.com/Panopto/Pages/Sessions/List.aspx#folderID="2559ad35-3fff-4ef1-a2ac-a951011eb91e"&maxResults=50
Third, the assignments (yes, you have to do these) cs.brown.edu/courses/csci0190/2018/assignments.html
Fourth, the labs that help you with the assignments: github.com/functionalCS/190labs

This is exactly what you will be doing:
- rewriting map and other well known programs, most of the standard library. Intrepreting very difficult requirements and abstracting them to make it very easy. You can easily do this.
This is exactly what you will be working in:
An online IDE. You can do this on your phone (no, really you can), there's nothing to install. The entire course can be done in: code.pyret.org/
Why?
Practice. If you actually do what is asked, you'll just 'get it'. You can program from now on, in any language you choose to focus on. Very well even. In fact, it's proven through statistics janestreet.com/tech-talks/curriculumn-design/
But how can I make money?
Get this: You'll know exactly what to do, once you are finished. That's all that needs to be said. You are at this level -> but when you're finished, you're at this level: ----------> and you just will know exactly what to do, me telling you is pointless, you'll know, yourself.

This is you now: youtu.be/SmiuqIcvfj0
This is you after: youtu.be/vRpeVcjMvNo

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Jack Wright
Jack Wright

Why you don't update your firefox thing anymore?

Gavin King
Gavin King

(OP)
You want to learn to program in <current year>
First, the book: papl.cs.brown.edu/2018/index.html
Second, the lectures: brown.hosted.panopto.com/Panopto/Pages/Sessions/List.aspx#folderID="2559ad35-3fff-4ef1-a2ac-a951011eb91e"&maxResults=50
Third, the assignments (yes, you have to do these) cs.brown.edu/courses/csci0190/2018/assignments.html
Fourth, the labs that help you with the assignments: github.com/functionalCS/190labs

This is exactly what you will be doing:
Rewriting map and other well known programs, most of the standard library. Intrepreting very difficult requirements and abstracting them to make it very easy. You can do this, it's statistically proven.
This is exactly what you will be working in:
An online IDE. You can do this on your phone (no, really you can), there's nothing to install. The entire course can be done in: code.pyret.org/
Why?
Practice. If you actually do what is asked, you'll just 'get it'. You can program from now on, in any language you choose to focus on. Very well even.
But how can I make money?
Get this: You'll know exactly what to do, once you are finished. That's all that needs to be said. You are at this level -> but when you're finished, you're at this level: ----------> and you just will know exactly what to do, me telling you is pointless, you'll know, yourself.

This is you now: youtu.be/SmiuqIcvfj0
This is you after: youtu.be/cu8e3nikyQk

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Kevin Morales
Kevin Morales

Dynamically typed languages make for an easy entry, but give you bad habits that you will need to unlearn the hard way.
Statically typed languages make for more friction at entry but are overall a smoother experience.
You are forced to interact with the tech more, but you are also less likely to run into really asinine type conversion bugs once you get past the absolute beginner phase. If you don't have the background that a statically typed language gives you, type conversion will become the bane of your existence.

Also, dynamically typed languages tend to be the ones to have pajeet-tier communities. I say tend to, because Java devs abuse exceptions as a flow control method all the time, which makes me think that a lot of the "best practices" of this statically typed language must be from India.

Benjamin Martinez
Benjamin Martinez

If this was actually accurate to corporate environments, then VBA would be among the top ten.
That alone proves that this list is full of shit. Github and Stackoverflow are populated by professional copypasters and data scientists, who tend to suck at programming and just want a babby-tier tool that doesn't interfere with their actual job.
Actual programmers and sysadmins don't use that shit, outside of scripting.

Isaiah Hughes
Isaiah Hughes

don't pass around pointers.
What's the point of having pointers if you don't pass en around, me negro amigo

Henry Johnson
Henry Johnson

Jow Forums is subconsciously telling you that it literally doesn't matter. we argue over that shit because we're looking at it from a perspective of already knowing a handful of languages and being able to discern differences between them beyond syntax. just learn one, preferably python since it's readable and easy to pick up. you can learn cs and shit later

Owen Hernandez
Owen Hernandez

not mentioning K. N KING for c
SAD

Zachary Evans
Zachary Evans

C#

Colton King
Colton King

Java is unironicallt the beat thing to begin with. It has pretty much every feature other languages have and every company needs a Java programmer, unlike C.

Brayden Sanchez
Brayden Sanchez

Any recommended books/sources to learn it? I've never programmed before

Asher Harris
Asher Harris

forget java learn kotlin its 100% interoperable with java and slightly more readable, start with kotlin docs just go to kotlinlang and learn from python to kotlin docs.
its an amazing introduction, and you have all the java libraries you can use and also wrappers/ports specially for kotlin later you can move to android development too.
kotlinlang.org/docs/tutorials/kotlin-for-py/introduction.html

Xavier Davis
Xavier Davis

python
teach bad habits
if you don't properly indent your code it won't even run

Ryder Baker
Ryder Baker

pass in the return type as an argument to your function, modify that, and return an int as your error code. Passing a pointer as a return type means you have to manage memory outside the function that allocated it, and that's rarely the right thing to do

Dylan Jackson
Dylan Jackson

Enterprise quality post, Ranjeet!

Blake Murphy
Blake Murphy

learn c so you can actually code, then go back and learn retard syntax of (x) language

Brayden Stewart
Brayden Stewart

Just learn how to program, becoming code monkey is easy
Then I looked at job descriptions, every single one was for junior dev
We expect University studies in technology, also Java and linux skills
We expect MS NAV, C#, .NET Framework, JavaScript, MS SQL, RDL CGit, PowerShell
We expect Solid knowledge of JavaScript and React from work, studies and/or hobbies
Previous experience in software development, C++ skill and an university degree in IT field
University studies related to IT, experience with graphical test engines and matrix calculation or linear algebra

Jesus christ, how horrifying. How does one even get a job as a programmer?

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Nicholas Ortiz
Nicholas Ortiz

i wanna make android thing
java
Bitch what the fuck? You mean learn Kotlin. It's the default language for Android now.

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